Water Safety

Whether at home or on vacation, it is always important to keep safety in mind when children are in or near water.

Drowning can happen at any time of year, but be especially cautious during the summer months when drowning incidents can increase up to 89% as compared to the rest of the year.


Water Safety at Home

The home environment has many hidden drowning hazards for children. Drowning deaths can occur not only in pools and spas, but in bathtubs, toilets and buckets. Keep these safety tips in mind to make your home safer from these hidden hazards.water-safety-bubble

LOCK

  • Keep doors to bathrooms and laundry rooms closed.
  • Large 5-gallon buckets are common household items and may be a potential hazard. Empty all buckets, containers and wading pools immediately after use. Store them upside-down and out of children’s reach.
  • Keep toilet lids closed and use toilet seat locks. According to the CPSC, toilets are overlooked as a source of drowning in the home – toddlers can fall headfirst into the toilet.
  • Once bath time is over, immediately drain the tub.

LOOK

  • Always stay within an arm’s reach of your child when he or she is in or near pools, spas, bathtubs, toilets or buckets.
  • Never leave your child unattended in a tub or around any other body of water, even if he or she knows how to swim.
  • Never leave your child alone or in the care of older children during bath time.
  • Children in baby bath seats and rings must be watched every second.

LEARN

  • Learn adult and infant CPR.

DID YOU KNOW?

  • One-third as many children under age 5 drown from other hazards around the home as drown in pools (CPSC).
  • Two-thirds of drowning deaths in the home, not including pools, occur in bathtubs (CPSC).
  • Home swimming pools are the most common place for a child younger than age 5 to drown.

Pool & Spa Safety

Pools and spas will be used more frequently as warmer weather arrives. Learn how to create safer pool and spa environments for children and what you can do to make your home pool or spa safer.

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LOCK

  • Put up a fence that is at least 4 feet high and is around all sides of the pool or spa. The fence should have a locking gate that closes and latches by itself.
  • Use door, gate and pool alarms.
  • Cover and lock pools and spas when you are not using them.
  • Remove or lock ladders to above ground pools and spas.
  • Use approved anti-entrapment drain covers and back up devices.

LOOK

  • Always watch children when they are in or near water.
  • When you are watching children, don’t be distracted by phone calls, text messages, reading or talking to others.
  • Watch children even if they know how to swim.
  • Children who can’t swim well or can’t swim at all should be within your reach and wear life jackets
  • Keep a phone near you – use it only to call for help if there is an emergency.
  • If a child is missing, check the water first.

LEARN

  • Learn how to swim – both children and adults should know how to swim.
  • Learn how to correctly choose and use U.S. Coast Guard approved life jackets
  • Learn how to use rescue equipment.
  • Learn adult and infant CPR.
  • Teach children never to swim alone.
  • Teach children not to play or swim near pool or spa drains.

DID YOU KNOW?

  • Drowning is one of the leading causes of death for children.
  • Most children were being watched by an adult just before they drowned.
  • Approximately 400 children age 14 and younger drown in pools and spas each year (CPSC).
  • Home swimming pools are the most common place for a child younger than age 5 to drown.

BEACH & BOATING SAFETY

Summer is a great time to spend time with family and friends at the beach or at the lake. Keep these safety tips in mind when spending time with family and friends in or near water this summer.

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LOOK

  • Always watch children when they are in or near water.
  • When you are watching children, don’t be distracted by phone calls, text messages, reading or talking to others.
  • Watch children even if they know how to swim.
  • Children and adults should wear U.S. Coast Guard approved life jackets – especially those who can’t swim well or can’t swim at all. Wear life jackets when boating and participating in water sports.
  • Keep an eye on the weather, waves and currents.
  • Keep a phone near you – use it only to call for help if there is an emergency.
  • If a child is missing, check the water first.

LEARN

  • Learn how to swim – both children and adults should know how to swim.
  • Learn How to Choose the Right Life Jacket.
  • The life jacket should be appropriate for the child’s size and weight.
  • The child’s chin or ears should not slip through the neck opening in the life jacket.
  • The life jacket should be properly fastened.
  • The life jacket should keep the child’s head above water.
  • Learn how to swim out of a rip current.
  • Learn how to use rescue equipment.
  • Learn adult and infant CPR.
  • Teach children never to swim alone and only to swim in designated swimming areas.
  • Teach children how to swim/float with a life jacket.
  • Teach children that swimming in open water is not the same as swimming in a pool. Teach them about uneven surfaces, river currents, ocean undertow and changing weather.

DID YOU KNOW?

According to the U.S. Coast Guard

  • One-half of all recreational boating fatalities happen in calm water.
  • Almost three-fourths of all fatal boating accident victims drowned – 84% were not wearing a life jacket.
  • In 2009, 18 children under the age of 13 years lost their lives while boating – 50% of these children died from drowning.

Life Jacket Loaner Board



From 2014 Life Jacket Loaner Board Program, posted by Safe Kids York County on 8/19/2014 (5 items)

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